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Marrakech Noir

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Northern Africa finally enters the Noir Series arena with a finely crafted volume of dark stories, all translated from Arabic and French. Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each story is set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book. Featuring brand-new stories by: Fati Northern Africa finally enters the Noir Series arena with a finely crafted volume of dark stories, all translated from Arabic and French. Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each story is set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book. Featuring brand-new stories by: Fatiha Morchid, Fouad Laroui, Taha Adnan, Mohamed Zouhair, Lahcen Bakour, Mahi Binebine, Halima Zine El Abidine, Hanane Derkaoui, Allal Bourqia, My Seddik Rabbaj, Abdelkader Benali, Mohamed Nedali, Mohamed Achaari, Karima Nadir, and Yassin Adnan. From the introduction by Yassin Adnan: Only palm trees remember that remote dark past, when highwaymen lay in wait behind their trunks for passing caravans . . . According to some stories, this is where the city’s name originated. Over the centuries the name has lost much of its caution and blackness . . . Moroccans today call Marrakech “The Joyful City,” or simply “The Joyful.” For the city is pledged to joy. The seekers of happiness and soirées head for it. Its nights are well lit and its days are bright. The city’s lovers are ready to read every type of story about it except those garbed in black. Even the city’s leading authors, the storytellers of Jamaa al-Fana, have always avoided in their fascinating halqas dark tales and stories . . . In all their variety these stories remain rooted in the Moroccan soil. Marrakech, the ancient Moroccan city, the country’s capital of tourism, the city of joy and sadness, the city of simple life, the city linked to the most international capitals through daily flights from its international airport, the city of the new European community, a winter resort for French retirees, and a refuge for immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa, the city of red nights and sex tourism, the city of the new generation of crimes . . .


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Northern Africa finally enters the Noir Series arena with a finely crafted volume of dark stories, all translated from Arabic and French. Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each story is set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book. Featuring brand-new stories by: Fati Northern Africa finally enters the Noir Series arena with a finely crafted volume of dark stories, all translated from Arabic and French. Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each story is set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book. Featuring brand-new stories by: Fatiha Morchid, Fouad Laroui, Taha Adnan, Mohamed Zouhair, Lahcen Bakour, Mahi Binebine, Halima Zine El Abidine, Hanane Derkaoui, Allal Bourqia, My Seddik Rabbaj, Abdelkader Benali, Mohamed Nedali, Mohamed Achaari, Karima Nadir, and Yassin Adnan. From the introduction by Yassin Adnan: Only palm trees remember that remote dark past, when highwaymen lay in wait behind their trunks for passing caravans . . . According to some stories, this is where the city’s name originated. Over the centuries the name has lost much of its caution and blackness . . . Moroccans today call Marrakech “The Joyful City,” or simply “The Joyful.” For the city is pledged to joy. The seekers of happiness and soirées head for it. Its nights are well lit and its days are bright. The city’s lovers are ready to read every type of story about it except those garbed in black. Even the city’s leading authors, the storytellers of Jamaa al-Fana, have always avoided in their fascinating halqas dark tales and stories . . . In all their variety these stories remain rooted in the Moroccan soil. Marrakech, the ancient Moroccan city, the country’s capital of tourism, the city of joy and sadness, the city of simple life, the city linked to the most international capitals through daily flights from its international airport, the city of the new European community, a winter resort for French retirees, and a refuge for immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa, the city of red nights and sex tourism, the city of the new generation of crimes . . .

34 review for Marrakech Noir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Marrakech Noir is one of the recent releases in the fabulous Akashic Noir Series. This time our guest editor is Yassin Adnan who takes us to Marrakech, introducing us to the grim and gritty side of his city. The book is organized into three sections: Hanging Crimes, The Red and the Black, and Outside the City’s Walls. The first section is more familiar in feeling for noir fans. The first story “The Mysterious Painting” is among my favorites, a mystery solved at the dinner table of a restaurant, Marrakech Noir is one of the recent releases in the fabulous Akashic Noir Series. This time our guest editor is Yassin Adnan who takes us to Marrakech, introducing us to the grim and gritty side of his city. The book is organized into three sections: Hanging Crimes, The Red and the Black, and Outside the City’s Walls. The first section is more familiar in feeling for noir fans. The first story “The Mysterious Painting” is among my favorites, a mystery solved at the dinner table of a restaurant, so clever. I also liked “The Mummy in the Pasha’s House” which is also a fairly traditional mystery told through stories. The second section, The Red and the Black refers to the idea that Marrakech is a red city, not a noir city, of joy, not crime. Here are stories of corruption and oppression, as well as crime. “Mama Aicha” about a woman advocating for her son’s release from prison just broke my heart and “Delirium” was a powerful story of two people who were linked together forever to their great loss. The last section, Outside the City’s Walls, explores the outlying area, home to the very poor and new immigrants. “Black Lover” was upsetting, using a racist epithet over and over and over, this was in translation so perhaps in Arabic, the epithet is less fraught, though I doubt it. It was unnecessary to the plot. The best story in this section is “A Person Fit for Murder” told by the murderer as he tries to understand his impulsive act. Anyone who has followed my book review blog for any length of time is probably aware that I love the Akashic Noir Series. I think these books are great gifts and a completely different approach to armchair travel. I confess I have found Baghdad Noir and Marrakech Noir more difficult than most books in the series. It’s funny because I studied Arabic, though I don’t remember much beyond how to conjugate kataba (to write). The stories in Marrakech Noir are more satisfying and more familiar, but both are full of stories that give so much backstory on neighbors and others who have very little to do with the plot, the stories are fulsome in their details, introducing people who really are not part of the story except as witnesses. Usually, in short stories, everything is trimmed away, so the fulsomeness is unfamiliar. I still enjoyed the anthology and recommend adding it to your collection of traveling the world on the Noir Express. I received an e-galley of Marrakech Noir from the publisher through Edelweiss. Marrakech Noir at Akashic Books Yassin Adnan on Facebook and bio at Arabic Fiction Akashic Noir Series https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melisende d'Outremer

    Another solid outing - this time, the setting is the exotic Marrakech. The city is one that is more prone to scandal than crime, and as such there is no tradition of noir. Fantastic storytelling is used to block out dark memories and dark tales are avoided. Even now, we are told, only 30 detective stories have been written in the last two decades! So our authors, from a variety of different cultural backgrounds, have taken inspiration from old crimes, long hidden, as well as those crimes now prev Another solid outing - this time, the setting is the exotic Marrakech. The city is one that is more prone to scandal than crime, and as such there is no tradition of noir. Fantastic storytelling is used to block out dark memories and dark tales are avoided. Even now, we are told, only 30 detective stories have been written in the last two decades! So our authors, from a variety of different cultural backgrounds, have taken inspiration from old crimes, long hidden, as well as those crimes now prevalent in a modern city. Add a touch of spice and humour, and you have Marrakech Noir!

  3. 4 out of 5

    nx74defiant

    This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers. Another collection of short stories. Marrakech is a city I'm not familiar with. The introduction was interesting about the lack of crime stories in Marrakech. I think the 1st story: The Mysterious Painting was my favorite

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Davalt

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fenna

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

  7. 4 out of 5

    Columbus

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heather Gregg

  9. 5 out of 5

    Akashic Books

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Soyer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Woody Chandler

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Pickens

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fleet Sparrow

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  18. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kara Lauren

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tom Donaghey

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mickey

  24. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  25. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Rate

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  28. 5 out of 5

    Douglass Abramson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  30. 5 out of 5

    Yusuf Nasrullah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

  32. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Jones

  33. 4 out of 5

    Diamond Keeling

  34. 5 out of 5

    Mark

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