kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Mary Shelley: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein's Creator

Availability: Ready to download

On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, comes a riveting biography of its author, Mary Shelley, whose life reads like a dark gothic novel, filled with scandal, death, drama, and one of the strangest love stories in literary history.  The story of Frankenstein’s creator is a strange, romantic, and tragic one, as deeply compelling as the novel itself. Mar On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, comes a riveting biography of its author, Mary Shelley, whose life reads like a dark gothic novel, filled with scandal, death, drama, and one of the strangest love stories in literary history.  The story of Frankenstein’s creator is a strange, romantic, and tragic one, as deeply compelling as the novel itself. Mary ran away to Lake Geneva with the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley when she was just sixteen. It was there, during a cold and wet summer, that she first imagined her story about a mad scientist who brought a corpse back to life. Success soon followed for Mary, but also great tragedy and misfortune.      Catherine Reef brings this passionate woman, brilliant writer, and forgotten feminist into crisp focus, detailing a life that was remarkable both before and after the publication of her iconic masterpiece. Includes index.  


Compare
kode adsense disini

On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, comes a riveting biography of its author, Mary Shelley, whose life reads like a dark gothic novel, filled with scandal, death, drama, and one of the strangest love stories in literary history.  The story of Frankenstein’s creator is a strange, romantic, and tragic one, as deeply compelling as the novel itself. Mar On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, comes a riveting biography of its author, Mary Shelley, whose life reads like a dark gothic novel, filled with scandal, death, drama, and one of the strangest love stories in literary history.  The story of Frankenstein’s creator is a strange, romantic, and tragic one, as deeply compelling as the novel itself. Mary ran away to Lake Geneva with the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley when she was just sixteen. It was there, during a cold and wet summer, that she first imagined her story about a mad scientist who brought a corpse back to life. Success soon followed for Mary, but also great tragedy and misfortune.      Catherine Reef brings this passionate woman, brilliant writer, and forgotten feminist into crisp focus, detailing a life that was remarkable both before and after the publication of her iconic masterpiece. Includes index.  

30 review for Mary Shelley: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein's Creator

  1. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♎ [howling libraries]

    yes pleeeeaaaaaase

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kav (xreadingsolacex)

    Disclaimer: I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This is no way impacted my review. Actual Rating: 3.75 stars I don't read non-fiction/biography-type work often, but this ARC was recommended to me by the publisher at their YALLWest booth back in May and it sounded interesting enough for me to pick up a copy. Let me just say, I am so thankful I took the opportunity to read and review this. Mary Shelley is known for being the woman behind Frankenstein, and that's t Disclaimer: I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This is no way impacted my review. Actual Rating: 3.75 stars I don't read non-fiction/biography-type work often, but this ARC was recommended to me by the publisher at their YALLWest booth back in May and it sounded interesting enough for me to pick up a copy. Let me just say, I am so thankful I took the opportunity to read and review this. Mary Shelley is known for being the woman behind Frankenstein, and that's the only way I've known her. I've never read Frankenstein myself (though now I certainly plan to change that), but as an avid feminist and reader, I've always known of Shelley's impact on science-fiction. So I knew when this was mentioned to me that I would be interested in learning more about her life and let's just say her life was certainly a heavy experience. Firstly, in terms of this as a book, it reads easy. It doesn't read blatantly like a 'memoir' and the wording is easy to follow. That being said, it is also very obviously historical. For most of my time reading it, I really couldn't figure out if I felt that that the progression was natural or too historical - it kind of went back and forth between the two. Now this may just be me personally because this is not my usual reading, but that was probably my biggest difficulty while reading it. Outside of it, because of this style, there were also a lot of name drops and date drops and that can be hard to follow. Obviously that does make sense for a biography, but for a reader more on the outside like me, it does take some getting used to and can be confusing to follow. All that being said, it was easy information to take in and Mary Shelley's life is so interesting. Thinking about her impact on science-fiction and literature today, it's so unbelievable to consider how difficult her life was and the amount of shit she dealt with. I don't want to get too into the details because you can easily find them, particularly by reading this biography, but I definitely have a newfound respect and admiration for Shelley and am so glad I got the chance to learn more about her. All in all, even if biographies aren't your cup of tea (or if they are), I'd recommend checking this one out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: Mary Shelley had been dead a year when her son unlocked her portable desk and found the remains of human heart. The heart, he knew, had been his father's. It had rested in the desk for thirty years, unseen and untouched, since the day in 1822 when Mary Shelley tenderly wrapped it in pages of poetry and put it away. Dust and bits of dried-up muscle were all that was left. Premise/plot: Catherine Reef's newest biography for young adults is Mary Shelley: The Strange True Tale of Fran First sentence: Mary Shelley had been dead a year when her son unlocked her portable desk and found the remains of human heart. The heart, he knew, had been his father's. It had rested in the desk for thirty years, unseen and untouched, since the day in 1822 when Mary Shelley tenderly wrapped it in pages of poetry and put it away. Dust and bits of dried-up muscle were all that was left. Premise/plot: Catherine Reef's newest biography for young adults is Mary Shelley: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein's Creator. Frankenstein is celebrating its 200th anniversary this year. Words to describe this one: dramatic, emotional, compelling, fascinating, heartbreaking, thought-provoking. Mary Shelley's life was just as tragic as it was unconventional. Her parents were near-celebrities among the intellectually elite. Her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, was an unconventional woman--an early feminist--who believed in living--experiencing--her life on her own terms despite the frowns of society. She believed in following her heart even if it meant breaking all the rules, even if it led to pain and heartbreak. She brought an illegitimate daughter with her into her marriage with William Godwin (Fanny). Godwin was a like-minded free thinker. At least when he was young with no teenage daughters of his own to raise! It would almost be easier to list everything he was against then to list everything he was for. Anti-tradition, anti-religion, anti-marriage, anti-government, etc. Both Godwin and Wollstonecraft were philosophically-minded writers whose works were published and somewhat applauded and celebrated--at least in certain circles. Mary Godwin's mother died when she was just days old. Godwin who at one time believed he'd never, ever marry now found himself marrying a second time. The woman (Mary Jane Clairmont) he married brought two children (Charles and Jane) from a previous relationship. It was a BLENDED family certainly: Fanny, Charles, Jane, Mary--and then "baby" William. Her father as I mentioned was well-known in certain circles and their house--their bookshop--had plenty of well-known or soon-to-be well-known authors. When Mary was a teenager--perhaps fifteen--she met a young would-be poet named Percy Bysshe Shelley. He was married--married with children. But neither one cared about conventions or morality. It was LOVE. The choice she made at sixteen to follow her heart's passion would change her life for better or worse forever and ever. Perhaps even more startling to modern readers is Mary's decision to bring her step-sister, Jane, with her. The two of them would run away with Percy Bysshe Shelley to Europe. It wasn't just a departure from England but from convention. (They'd return to England...but never quite to convention.) Their lives were packed with DRAMA, DRAMA, AND MORE DRAMA. Mary found herself at the center of it all--an eyewitness to an era. The Romantic poets didn't just approach poetry in a "new," "fresh," "innovative," "genius," way. It was a lifestyle; the poems were a result of how they saw the world around them, what they thought, how they thought. It was thrilling AND disturbing. They wouldn't want it any other way. But would Mary? The book does NOT address that. Perhaps we'll never know the many emotional layers of her heart and mind. (How she felt about her husband, her sister, their many friends that brought chaos and fun into their lives.) My thoughts: Mary Shelley's life was like a wreck--car, train, ship, take your pick--a devastating crash-boom-bang in many ways. But it makes for a fascinating read. I appreciated that the book was more than just a traditional biography. It also focused on her works. It focuses on Frankenstein, of course, but it also focuses on her other works. She didn't just write one book. She kept writing throughout her life. The book includes how her work(s) were critically received (then and now). It also focused on relationships. To read of Mary Shelley is to read of the Romantic poets. For better or worse.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Janet Slipak

    On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, comes a riveting biography of its author, Mary Shelley, whose life reads like a dark gothic novel, filled with scandal, death, drama, and one of the strangest love stories in literary history. The story of Frankenstein’s creator is a strange, romantic, and tragic one, as deeply compelling as the novel itself. Mary ran away to Lake Geneva with the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley when she was just sixteen. It was there, during a cold and wet s On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein, comes a riveting biography of its author, Mary Shelley, whose life reads like a dark gothic novel, filled with scandal, death, drama, and one of the strangest love stories in literary history. The story of Frankenstein’s creator is a strange, romantic, and tragic one, as deeply compelling as the novel itself. Mary ran away to Lake Geneva with the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley when she was just sixteen. It was there, during a cold and wet summer, that she first imagined her story about a mad scientist who brought a corpse back to life. Success soon followed for Mary, but also great tragedy and misfortune. Catherine Reef brings this passionate woman, brilliant writer, and forgotten feminist into crisp focus, detailing a life that was remarkable both before and after the publication of her iconic masterpiece. Includes index. Out September, 2018 MY THOUGHTS: I was provided a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. This is a biography of an extraordinary woman who accomplished something during a time that such a feat was seldom heard of. The motivation behind her work is clearly dictated by her past, previous relationships and issues of mental illness. However, the end result of her work will go on to become great classics of both intuition and imagination combined. I read this book in one sitting and was pleasantly surprised to see that the author left out many of Mary's darker rumored experiences and stayed to the facts. There are many drier versions of Mary's biography out there, but this one was both entertaining, informative and smooth in its deliverance. Loved the book!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Molly Likovich

    SPOILER FREE! 4.5 STARS I received an ARC of this book on Books For Trade on twitter. I am a huge fan of Mary Shelley, and have read a few accounts on her life, but this one was excellent. This book is concise and doesn't dally too long in either a stance of emotionally removed factual deliverance, or overly emotionally involved fictionalization of events. One thing I really appreciated about this biography, is most accounts I read only follow Mary Shelley's life in-depth up through the death of SPOILER FREE! 4.5 STARS I received an ARC of this book on Books For Trade on twitter. I am a huge fan of Mary Shelley, and have read a few accounts on her life, but this one was excellent. This book is concise and doesn't dally too long in either a stance of emotionally removed factual deliverance, or overly emotionally involved fictionalization of events. One thing I really appreciated about this biography, is most accounts I read only follow Mary Shelley's life in-depth up through the death of her husband, Percy Shelley, then just jump ahead to how her story lived on after her death. However, this account details her life very thoroughly after Percy's passing and I found it fascinating, learning many things about her I didn't know. This account also paid special attention to all her other marvelous fiction works besides Frankenstein that weren't appreciated till much after her time. The few reasons this book couldn't get a full five stars from me is because I don't believe it delved deeply enough into unpacking the mental state of Mary and her companions. Clearly mental illness was apparent in many of the characters of Mary's life, Mary herself included, but the only brief mention of it is a passing line about her stepsister, Claire. I also would've liked if the text harbored more on the radical feminist ideals Mary carried and presented throughout her life after discovering the works of her late mother, Mary Wolstonecraft. And lastly, this account glossed over the emotional abuse of Mary's marriage to Percy, and the toxicity of their relationship. I can understand such a stance is based more on opinion than fact, but the emotional abuses Mary faced in her life from those that she loved was abundant, and I wanted a slightly more compassionate account of them. However this book is highly readable and enjoyable and fast-paced, unlike almost every other biography I've ever read. It's a great reader for fans of Shelley, but also so well explained that even if you've never even picked up Frankenstein you can get a good sense not only of her, but of her seminal work. I will discuss this more on my YouTube channel: http://www.YouTube.com/MagiKwand99

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    What a beautiful tribute to Mary Shelley that Reef has captured. As I spoke when I shared this with a group of librarian's today, it can be used not only has a biography for Shelley but also historical reference for the time period. Reef includes so much background information around everything from illness to inventions, transportation and finances that there's literally two stories in one- historical and biographical. And yes, how could one woman survive the loss of three babies, only to see o What a beautiful tribute to Mary Shelley that Reef has captured. As I spoke when I shared this with a group of librarian's today, it can be used not only has a biography for Shelley but also historical reference for the time period. Reef includes so much background information around everything from illness to inventions, transportation and finances that there's literally two stories in one- historical and biographical. And yes, how could one woman survive the loss of three babies, only to see one live a full life? She survived illness and the sea death of her husband (who had been married to another), disowned, disenfranchised and more. A portrait of the woman who created Frankenstein.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Fenner

    Review Originally Posted on Taylor Fenner's Bookish World Before Josh & I... Before F. Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald... There was Mary Wollstonecraft and Percy Bysshe Shelley... the most dysfunctional couple of their time. (In my opinion). Let me start by saying that I don't usually read non-fiction books, especially not biographies, but I won a copy of this book from the publisher and it looked really good and was fairly short and I was in a book rut anyway so I dove in... and I couldn't put it d Review Originally Posted on Taylor Fenner's Bookish World Before Josh & I... Before F. Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald... There was Mary Wollstonecraft and Percy Bysshe Shelley... the most dysfunctional couple of their time. (In my opinion). Let me start by saying that I don't usually read non-fiction books, especially not biographies, but I won a copy of this book from the publisher and it looked really good and was fairly short and I was in a book rut anyway so I dove in... and I couldn't put it down! I was in awe of Mary Shelley's life. I mean, you know the author, you know her most famous work, but I did not know what she had done to be so universally disliked by her peers. From her parent's backgrounds to her childhood spent hanging out by her mother's grave to running away with a married man, Percy Bysshe Shelley when she was only 16 and the tumultuous life they would live together - I was fascinated! I couldn't get enough. I mean their lifestyle, their traveling, their money woes, and Mary's health issues, it was like reading Z by Therese Anne Fowler only 100 years earlier in Europe. These are the type of historical women I look up to, the kind that resonate with me the most. Catherine Reef did a wonderful job bringing Mary to life on the page and I recommend this book to everyone familiar with Mary Shelley's life and those that aren't.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    DNF Mary Shelley is obviously a fascinating woman but the writing style made this a struggle to read. It basically races through a series of facts - taking strange detours to what, essentially, become biographies of other people. I had high hopes for this one but alas, it wasn't for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    lacy [a ravenclaw library]

    A special thank you goes out to Clarion books for sending me an ARC of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Literally take my rating with a grain of salt. This book was good and I enjoyed it a lot but I didn't realize that it was middle grade and I don't think I was the target audience for this particular book. That being said, I did enjoy this book. It had pictures, which I always am a fan of. It would be awesome to have seen them in color (the ones that are in color; I know some pi A special thank you goes out to Clarion books for sending me an ARC of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Literally take my rating with a grain of salt. This book was good and I enjoyed it a lot but I didn't realize that it was middle grade and I don't think I was the target audience for this particular book. That being said, I did enjoy this book. It had pictures, which I always am a fan of. It would be awesome to have seen them in color (the ones that are in color; I know some pictures will be in black and white) and hopefully the published version will have them. The pictures added a nice element and really brought Mary Shelley's world to life. Like I mentioned above, this book is middle grade but I would consider it upper middle grade. Someone in seventh or eighth grade would enjoy this and be able to understand it. Actually, I’m sure people of all ages would enjoy this if they loved Frankenstein. Overall, this was delightful, despite it being written for a younger person. People of all ages would enjoy the pictures and the thrilling tale of Mary Shelley

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kacey

    I already knew some stuff about Mary Shelley prior to reading this, like her hanging out in graveyards when she was younger or her keeping her husband's heart in her desk. But I love learning more about favorite authors, so I was looking forward to reading this. I did learn some things I didn't know. I had no idea she was such a prolific writer, and I'm coming away from this wanting to track down more of her stuff to read. I also didn't know she had close ties with Lord Byron. This book provided I already knew some stuff about Mary Shelley prior to reading this, like her hanging out in graveyards when she was younger or her keeping her husband's heart in her desk. But I love learning more about favorite authors, so I was looking forward to reading this. I did learn some things I didn't know. I had no idea she was such a prolific writer, and I'm coming away from this wanting to track down more of her stuff to read. I also didn't know she had close ties with Lord Byron. This book provided a lot of details about her life, like how she was estranged from her father and how much loss she suffered over the years. The only criticism I would have is that all these details are given out rather quickly. This book isn't even two hundred pages long, and I feel like that's a gross disservice to this fascinating and remarkable woman. I guess it's okay for younger readers but it still feels like a lot of details are glossed over or just touched on too quickly. I also didn't really like that this book summarized the story of Frankenstein. It was unnecessary and took up space that could've been given to Mary's life. Even the epilogue sped through Mary's influence on the world. I guess I'm going to have to find another biography of hers somewhere. I still liked it because I learned things about her I didn't know, but it didn't take enough time with any of the information.

  11. 4 out of 5

    SundayAtDusk

    Not until I got this book, did I realize it was a YA one. That was okay, though, since I doubt I could have made it through an adult biography about Mary Shelley. Reading about her obviously makes one also have to read a lot about Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron--two poets who bore me to tears. Author Catherine Reef unfortunately seemed to give them more attention, too, while they were alive, than she did Mary Shelley. What motivated Mary Shelley to write and how she wrote seemed to be skimm Not until I got this book, did I realize it was a YA one. That was okay, though, since I doubt I could have made it through an adult biography about Mary Shelley. Reading about her obviously makes one also have to read a lot about Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron--two poets who bore me to tears. Author Catherine Reef unfortunately seemed to give them more attention, too, while they were alive, than she did Mary Shelley. What motivated Mary Shelley to write and how she wrote seemed to be skimmed over, in my opinion. Most of this YA book just seemed like a never-ending description of the Shelleys moving from one place to another, losing children to one thing or another, and always having money concerns about one thing or another. While it's a highly readable book with lots of information, it's probably not going to inspire many to write like or to want to be like Mary Shelley. (Note: I received a free ARC of this book from Amazon Vine.)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robin Moore

    The biographer tells the story of Mary Godwin, who is known for her acclaimed publication, Frankenstein. Mary's mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, an early feminist, died when just 11 days after Mary's birth. At just 16 years of age, Mary ran away with Percy Bysshe Shelley, the acclaimed poet. They moved many times & had 4 children, but only one lived to adulthood. Percy died at sea at the age of 29. Mary had endured notoriety for her relationship with Shelley, had gained literary fame at the age The biographer tells the story of Mary Godwin, who is known for her acclaimed publication, Frankenstein. Mary's mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, an early feminist, died when just 11 days after Mary's birth. At just 16 years of age, Mary ran away with Percy Bysshe Shelley, the acclaimed poet. They moved many times & had 4 children, but only one lived to adulthood. Percy died at sea at the age of 29. Mary had endured notoriety for her relationship with Shelley, had gained literary fame at the age of 19 as the author of Frankenstein, and was dead at age of 53.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I have a confession to make - I still have not read the original edition of Frankenstein! That said, this book definitely inspired me to try! The book is a great one to read if you don't read many biographies (like myself) - the events in Mary's life were put out in an easy-to-follow way, and the pictures to go with the text were nice add-ons. It probably also helped that Mary led a very interesting, and at times scandalous, life. Only wish was for some of the pictures and paintings to be in col I have a confession to make - I still have not read the original edition of Frankenstein! That said, this book definitely inspired me to try! The book is a great one to read if you don't read many biographies (like myself) - the events in Mary's life were put out in an easy-to-follow way, and the pictures to go with the text were nice add-ons. It probably also helped that Mary led a very interesting, and at times scandalous, life. Only wish was for some of the pictures and paintings to be in color!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Catherine Reef has written another excellent biography for young people. Previous subjects include the Brontë sisters, Jane Austen, and Queen Victoria; this volume on Shelley is equally well-written and researched. Sources are well documented. Highly recommended for middle and high school students who are developing interests in British history and literature.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cambear

    Three and a half stars Mary Shelley had a very unconventional life which makes for great reading. A lot of that is chronicled here in a very readable format with lots of pictures and illustrations. A few stories and rumors are omitted, but it’s still a fascinating story of the woman behind a landmark piece of art. Thanks to HMH Teen for providing a copy of the book for review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vannie

    2/5 ARC from HMHteen for an honest review It was interesting, I do have to say, but its only a biography type book about Mary Shelley, that sometimes come off kind of distant and unfeeling. I had originally thought this would be a spin off of the Mary Shelley, but it was not.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Lively

    Great information on a life of a poet, author and woman not recognized for her genius in her time

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  20. 4 out of 5

    Teenreadsdotcom

    Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley is a name we all know. She is not just the mother of FRANKENSTEIN, but of science fiction as we know it. Outside of her name and her famous book, she is somewhat of a mystery. Through MARY SHELLEY: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein’s Creator, Catherine Reef helps to lift the veil on this incredible and strong woman’s life, 200 years after the original publication of the book that catapulted Mary Shelley into all our lives. From the meeting of Mary’s parents to her Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley is a name we all know. She is not just the mother of FRANKENSTEIN, but of science fiction as we know it. Outside of her name and her famous book, she is somewhat of a mystery. Through MARY SHELLEY: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein’s Creator, Catherine Reef helps to lift the veil on this incredible and strong woman’s life, 200 years after the original publication of the book that catapulted Mary Shelley into all our lives. From the meeting of Mary’s parents to her voyage as a young girl to Scotland, the meeting of her lover, her exile, her fame, Reef tells all. In just under 200 pages Reef has written of every move, every heartbreak and every high that Mary experienced in her lifetime with conviction, concision, and passion. MARY SHELLEY is for fans of Mary Shelley, newcomers to Mary and students grudgingly searching for information. I am someone who considers myself a huge fan of Mary Shelley --- yet I still know very little about her. I’ve heard both the rumors and the supposed facts that are in contradiction to other supposed facts --- that makes it a bit hard to know what to trust. So, when I heard there’d be a published biography on the iconic author --- even better, a YA marketed biography --- I jolted alive and devoured said book with fervor in the hopes of learning something new; or at the very least, seeing confirmation towards other things I’ve heard about Wollstonecraft Shelley. Catherine Reef’s account of Mary’s life is composed of factual, indisputable events and features a lengthy section of notes, resources and further reading regarding her text. Catherine Reef’s MARY SHELLEY is not just border-to-border text; featured are many pictures. From portraits of the people written about to drawings of the landscapes mentioned, all the photos accompanying Reef’s research helps make the book even more immersive. It was an aspect I found myself fond of as it is both just an overall fascinating thing to see, but also helps break up all the information we are consuming so it doesn’t just all jam together and readers find themselves actually retaining what they just read. The photos are thoughtfully placed, as well as expertly introduced into relevance within the text by Reef. To effectively learn about Mary, we must learn about the people she interacted with. Notable people in her life include: husband and poet, Percy Bysshe Shelley; poet and friend, Lord Byron; step-sister Claire Clairmont; and her father, William Godwin. Reef makes us well acquainted with each of the aforementioned people, as well as the many other people in Mary’s life. It’s important to not just know their names, but truly who they were both as people and in relation to Mary. Reef makes us aware of those things, but unfortunately, it sometimes made it seem that the book was more focused on these characters rather than Mary…especially in regards to Percy and Lord Byron. Unfortunate as that is, it’s not an entirely uncommon thing to see in articles about Mary Shelley. Fortunately, Reef continues to cover Mary’s life long after the death of Percy, something that I have often seen skipped over until her own death, as though Mary simply stopped existing after her husband. Seeing this part of her life featured excited me greatly and helped secure MARY SHELLEY as a book I would highly recommend to educators and librarians for their collections. The only thing I found myself not enjoying was how emotionally distant the book felt. If you’ve picked this book up purely for research, it’s great; straightforward and doesn’t confuse anything with speculative feelings or events. If you’re reading with the hopes of feeling a deeper emotional connection or knowledge of Mary Shelley, you may find yourself a bit disappointed. As someone who has read other biographical accounts of Mary Shelley’s life, a lot of what I read wasn’t entirely new information. However, I did still find myself learning new things. That’s really all I can ask from a biography. Up until reading MARY SHELLEY, I surprisingly hadn’t heard of most of Mary’s other published writings. In introducing me to these previously unknown titles, Reef has added another flame in the fire that is my love for Shelley, and I am excitedly keeping an eye out for not just Mary’s books, but Catherine Reef’s other biographical works as well. MARY SHELLEY is a wonderful resource book to have in the classroom and library. It is the type of book that students will find exceptionally helpful for essays and further understanding of Mary’s life. Reef’s writing is comprehensive and to the point. She doesn’t leave the reader going around in circles, reading the same exact information on multiple pages; nor does she complicate her writing in an attempt to appear “more scholarly”, as is often seen in non-fiction. Reef’s MARY SHELLEY: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein’s Creator is a book that readers of every age can read and understand. Reviewed by Olivia W

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  22. 5 out of 5

    PWRL

    SM

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brigid Armbrust

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erin Willoughby

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kris Cram

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kim Baccellia

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lori Anthony

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nikky Trufin

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.