kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Beneath the Mother Tree

Availability: Ready to download

A spine-chilling mystery and contemporary love story, Beneath the Mother Tree plays out in a unique and wild Australian setting, interweaving Indigenous history and Irish mythology. On a small island, something sinister is at play. Resident alcoholic Grappa believes it’s the Far Dorocha, dark servant of the Faery queen, whose seductive music lures you into their abyss. His A spine-chilling mystery and contemporary love story, Beneath the Mother Tree plays out in a unique and wild Australian setting, interweaving Indigenous history and Irish mythology. On a small island, something sinister is at play. Resident alcoholic Grappa believes it’s the Far Dorocha, dark servant of the Faery queen, whose seductive music lures you into their abyss. His granddaughter Ayla has other ideas, especially once she meets the mysterious flute player she heard on the beach. Riley and his mother have moved to the island to escape their grief. But when the tight-knit community is beset by a series of strange deaths, the enigmatic newcomers quickly garner the ire of the locals. Can Ayla uncover the mystery at the heart of the island’s darkness before it is too late? Wrought with sensuousness and lyricism, D.M. Cameron’s debut novel Beneath the Mother Tree is a thrilling journey, rhythmically fierce and eagerly awaited.


Compare
kode adsense disini

A spine-chilling mystery and contemporary love story, Beneath the Mother Tree plays out in a unique and wild Australian setting, interweaving Indigenous history and Irish mythology. On a small island, something sinister is at play. Resident alcoholic Grappa believes it’s the Far Dorocha, dark servant of the Faery queen, whose seductive music lures you into their abyss. His A spine-chilling mystery and contemporary love story, Beneath the Mother Tree plays out in a unique and wild Australian setting, interweaving Indigenous history and Irish mythology. On a small island, something sinister is at play. Resident alcoholic Grappa believes it’s the Far Dorocha, dark servant of the Faery queen, whose seductive music lures you into their abyss. His granddaughter Ayla has other ideas, especially once she meets the mysterious flute player she heard on the beach. Riley and his mother have moved to the island to escape their grief. But when the tight-knit community is beset by a series of strange deaths, the enigmatic newcomers quickly garner the ire of the locals. Can Ayla uncover the mystery at the heart of the island’s darkness before it is too late? Wrought with sensuousness and lyricism, D.M. Cameron’s debut novel Beneath the Mother Tree is a thrilling journey, rhythmically fierce and eagerly awaited.

30 review for Beneath the Mother Tree

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    It's hard to believe this is a debut novel. The writing is very assured, the premise original and the atmosphere evocative and mystical. Set on an island off the SE Queensland coast with a small tight knit community, the balance of the island is disturbed when two strangers arrive. Marlise and her 20y old son Riley, mourning the death of Riley's stepfather have left their home in the rainforest and moved into an old house on the edge of a mosquito infested swamp swamp. Marlise is an entomologist It's hard to believe this is a debut novel. The writing is very assured, the premise original and the atmosphere evocative and mystical. Set on an island off the SE Queensland coast with a small tight knit community, the balance of the island is disturbed when two strangers arrive. Marlise and her 20y old son Riley, mourning the death of Riley's stepfather have left their home in the rainforest and moved into an old house on the edge of a mosquito infested swamp swamp. Marlise is an entomologist who studies mosquitos so this is paradise for her but not so much for Riley who has had a very sheltered and lonely upbringing in the rainforest. Wandering around the island, Riley's beautiful flute playing soon catches the attention of Ayla, a young girl who's Irish grandfather warns her that he is the mythical Far Dorocha, servant of the Faery Queen of Irish folklore come to enchant her and steal her away. Soon deaths and strange happenings occur, disturbing the equilibrium of the island's community. The combination of Irish folklore with indigenous beliefs and the overarching concept of the island's mother tree protecting them all works very well in this novel. The descriptions of the island's plant and animal life and the smells of the forest and the sea all feels very earthy and elemental. Ayla is forever rescuing animals and has grown up to love the island and become a part of it. She has been infused with her grandad's stories all her life but also with the stories of the lands first people told to her by her Aboriginal friend Mandy and her relatives. Riley is an innocent, naive boy who knows little of the world and has been overprotected and dominated by his mother who has secrets to hide and as the book goes on becomes more and more unbalanced. It's lovely to watch him fall in love with Ayla and feel the stranglehold his mother has on him loosen. Ms Cameron has successfully woven a wonderful tale steeped in myths and magic with one of romance, nature and madness. With thanks to the author, D.M. Cameron for a digital copy of the book to read and review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Riley and his mother Marlise had recently moved to the small island of Moondarrawah after the death of Riley’s step-father. He hadn’t wanted to move and hated the old, broken down house they lived in. He also hated his mother’s cloying manner with him, almost as if he was still a small child. Her strange career and love of mosquitos wasn’t new to Riley, but he still didn’t feel comfortable with it. Ayla had lived on the island her whole life. She and her mother lived in their home together after Riley and his mother Marlise had recently moved to the small island of Moondarrawah after the death of Riley’s step-father. He hadn’t wanted to move and hated the old, broken down house they lived in. He also hated his mother’s cloying manner with him, almost as if he was still a small child. Her strange career and love of mosquitos wasn’t new to Riley, but he still didn’t feel comfortable with it. Ayla had lived on the island her whole life. She and her mother lived in their home together after Ayla’s father had been lost at sea a few years before. Her grandfather, whom she called Grappa, lived on his boat and Ayla was exceptionally close to him. His knowledge of the faery folk and Irish folklore had been a mainstay through her childhood and beyond. But when they heard the mystical music from a flute, Grappa was frightened for Ayla. It was the Far Dorocha and he was sure it would lure Ayla away from him and her island home. But why did Jip die? And Toto? Could the strange deaths be attributed to what the locals suspected? Danger and menace was filling the island which had once been a peaceful, happy place. Would the mother tree know the answers? Ayla had her suspicions, but it was putting her in harm’s way to voice them… Beneath the Mother Tree is a spectacular debut novel with a stunning cover by Aussie author D.M. Cameron which I completely devoured! Unusual, unique and fascinating, the characters are well written; the plot filled with intrigue and evocative magic. Irish folklore blended with Indigenous culture to make a book like one I’ve never read before. I can’t wait to read her next. Well done Ms Cameron! Highly recommended. With thanks to the author for my ARC to read and review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    This book is brimming with Mother Nature and her creations; overflowing with love and respect for the natural world. It also comes with a healthy side of imagination and fantasy. LOVED IT. Ayla lives on a small island, immersed in nature and her Grappa's stories - Irish folk tales passed down to him by his own grandmother. Ayla knows she's too old to believe in his tales of faeries and tree-folk any more, but part of her won't let them go. A mother and son arrive on the island, bringing their bagga This book is brimming with Mother Nature and her creations; overflowing with love and respect for the natural world. It also comes with a healthy side of imagination and fantasy. LOVED IT. Ayla lives on a small island, immersed in nature and her Grappa's stories - Irish folk tales passed down to him by his own grandmother. Ayla knows she's too old to believe in his tales of faeries and tree-folk any more, but part of her won't let them go. A mother and son arrive on the island, bringing their baggage with them. Riley is still hurting from the loss of his step-father, David, and his relationship with his mosquito-obsessed mother is strained. Marlise is afraid that if Riley discovers her secret, she'll lose him. Grappa may be a drunk, but he knows the stories are true, and he's convinced Far Dorocha - dark servant to the Faery Queen - is after his Ayla. He'll stop at nothing to protect her. This compelling tale is part romance, part mystery. As Ayla and Riley inevitably get to know one another, the reader is also trying to puzzle out the full extent of Marlise's secret. There's also that question of whether the novel intends to stray into the realm of fantasy, or whether the fantasy is simply left to stem from inference and the imagination of the reader. The island has a very real presence; the writing is beautifully crafted to create a unique character from its setting, with its own history. The ever-present mosquitoes aid the contrast of sandy beaches and boggy wetland, and the island's inhabitants are typical small-towners. I really enjoyed the atypical relationships. Marlise clearly has a few screws loose, but at times I still felt sorry for the way she was so afraid of losing Riley. A mother's love is a powerful thing. Grappa frustrated me with his determination to blame everything on signs and myths etc. but it makes him such a wonderful character, and his stubborn faith is really admirable. Ayla admits she's not like others her age, and the relationship with Riley blossoms slowly and timidly, which made it much more believable and far more endearing than the insta-love that ruins so many other novels. I often felt the urge to slap at non-existent mosquitoes, so powerful was their presence. This is a tangled story of faith, love and nature. I found it instantly compelling, and its clever blend of mystery, myth and romance means this novel has something for most readers. Beautifully written and absolutely captivating. Highly recommend. Many thanks to the author for my ARC.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    2.5 stars. I have a full spoiler-free review on my blog. Link: https://amelianamora18.wixsite.com/am...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sally906

    BENEATH THE MOTHER TREE started very slowly; nothing really happens straight away and yet from the very first page there’s a hint of something not quite right. This sense of wrongness increased as the story progressed until it got to the stage where you know darn well bad things are happening – but you can’t explain what they are. Ayla has lived on an island off the coast of Queensland for her whole life, she has grown up with her grandfather’s tales of Irish myths and also the history of both w BENEATH THE MOTHER TREE started very slowly; nothing really happens straight away and yet from the very first page there’s a hint of something not quite right. This sense of wrongness increased as the story progressed until it got to the stage where you know darn well bad things are happening – but you can’t explain what they are. Ayla has lived on an island off the coast of Queensland for her whole life, she has grown up with her grandfather’s tales of Irish myths and also the history of both white settlement and, through her friend Mandy and her relatives, Indigenous traditions and stories. This blend of myth and fact has formed her outlook at life. The story opens with Ayla alone on the beach when she hears a flute playing – it plays so beautifully that it lures her to come closer. She remembers a conversation with her grandfather, an alcoholic, where he told her that recent imagined omens were saying that something bad is coming. She also remembered his story of how her grandmother was seduced by a flute playing fairy. Whilst she dismisses her grandfather’s warnings because they live in Australia not Ireland – there are no little people – good or evil here. Ayla still goes and hides in the large tree that is called the mother tree until she no longer hears the flute. The flute player is not an Irish fairy – he is Riley. Riley has just moved to the island with his mother Marlise after the death of his stepfather. Marlise is a world expert on mosquitos and the islanders want to rid the swamp of mosquitoes as their presence is stopping the tourists from coming over to the island. Then the deaths start – animal and human. Deaths in the past and deaths in the present have to be solved to prevent deaths in the future. The story is told from mostly the viewpoints of Ayla and Riley; and every so often from the view point of Marlise. Now there is mind you don’t want to spend much time in!! Gradually Ayla and Riley work out the mysterious goings on, and Irish mythology, Aboriginal traditions and history blend to protect the island from its doom in an edge of the seat climax. I loved Ayla and Riley they were so focused and protective of each other. Ayla’s Aboriginal friend Mandy was lovely too. And Marlise? Let’s just say she came alive on the pages and her madness, or was it her sanity? Was amazing to behold. BENEATH THE MOTHER TREE was a fabulous debut novel. The author D.M. Cameron lived in SE Queensland and based her island on islands in Moreton Bay and coastal land between the Brisbane and Logan Rivers. She grew up with people of the Quandamooka Nation and used their traditions and beliefs in her story. BENEATH THE MOTHER TREE is her love story to these people, her friends. BENEATH THE MOTHER TREE takes you on a journey from normal day to day living to oh my goodness this can’t be happening very slowly, adding to the tension word by word, page by page until you at a climax where people are fighting for their very lives. Amazing. I would certainly read any more books written by her, and hope this is the first of many. With thanks to MidnightSun Publishing for my copy to read and review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    4.5★s Beneath The Mother Tree is the first novel by Australian author, D.M. Cameron. The small community on the island (Moondarrawah) watches with great interest as Marlise, tall and beautiful, arrives in a removals truck, with all her worldly goods, to move into the old Johnston place by the mangrove swamp. Some are more welcoming than others. Many believe the Johnston house is haunted, but its location is perfect for Marlise’s entomological research. But Grappa is more concerned about the raven- 4.5★s Beneath The Mother Tree is the first novel by Australian author, D.M. Cameron. The small community on the island (Moondarrawah) watches with great interest as Marlise, tall and beautiful, arrives in a removals truck, with all her worldly goods, to move into the old Johnston place by the mangrove swamp. Some are more welcoming than others. Many believe the Johnston house is haunted, but its location is perfect for Marlise’s entomological research. But Grappa is more concerned about the raven-haired young man whose flute music seems to have cast a spell over his granddaughter, Ayla. Grappa grew up with his Irish Gran’s tales of folklore and Fey, and he’s sure this black-haired creature is the Far Dorocha, the one who tried to tempt his Nettie away from their fledgling marriage. He needs to make sure she realises the danger this creature poses. Ayla was practically weaned on Grappa’s stories about the Nor Folk and their connection to her favourite place on the island, at the foot of the giant fig, but she’s beginning to think that he has really lost it this time: he’s raving about spells and menace and he has even attacked her new friend, Riley. Has he been drinking even more than usual? Cameron sets her tale on a tropical island off the coast of Queensland and her descriptions easily evoke the heat and humidity, the mosquitoes and the sometimes-magical quality of setting. While the support cast are characters easily recognisable to anyone who has lived in a small community, initially Riley seems unbelievably naïve, while Marlise’s overprotectiveness feels exaggerated. But patience and persistence yields a better understanding of this pair. Cameron's depiction of a psychopath with psychotic episodes, from both within and without, is very convincing. Similarly, she deftly demonstrates the delicate balance between gossip and goodwill in a tightknit little town. This is a story that begins rather sedately but builds to an exciting climax. An impressive debut novel. This unbiased review is from a copy provided by the author.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cass Moriarty

    Beneath the Mother Tree (MidnightSun Publishing 2018), the debut novel by DM Cameron, is an absorbing and magical tale of rich Irish mythology braided with Indigenous history and language. The story flies, dream-like, through fantastical possibilities whilst remaining firmly grounded with a real-life narrative of mystery. A confounding mixture of genres, Beneath the Mother Tree exudes the wisdom of Aboriginal elders, the unpredictability of psychological disturbance, the fear and confrontation o Beneath the Mother Tree (MidnightSun Publishing 2018), the debut novel by DM Cameron, is an absorbing and magical tale of rich Irish mythology braided with Indigenous history and language. The story flies, dream-like, through fantastical possibilities whilst remaining firmly grounded with a real-life narrative of mystery. A confounding mixture of genres, Beneath the Mother Tree exudes the wisdom of Aboriginal elders, the unpredictability of psychological disturbance, the fear and confrontation of family violence and divided loyalties, the mystical wonderment of faery folklore and the urgent determination of young love. It reminded me a little of The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart, particularly in the way the well-researched and approved Indigenous content was woven into the tale to demonstrate cultural practices and to record historical events. The Mother Tree of the title refers to a large tree noted by scientists for its symbiotic connection to the land, some even believing communication occurs underground through a complex root system. There is an actual Mother Tree in this book, revered by both Aboriginal people, and also white people of Irish heritage, for its permanence, its meaning, its sense of custodianship of the land. The connection between people and place is strong throughout this story; each character and every subplot seem to pose the questions: What is belonging? To what does our history entitle us? How does our story connect with the land? D.M. Cameron has really done her homework in identifying key historical and cultural facts and blending them with fictionalised embellishments to produce writing that is clearly of the imagination, and yet also moored in tradition and truth. The nature writing is descriptive, evocative and sensual. She writes of native flora and fauna, of exotic introduced species, of wild weather, and of the touch of humans on the landscape. Reading the depictions of environment is a sensory experience as she describes each leaf and feather, every shell and bird call. The book is a love song to nature, a plea to respect and treasure the land we occupy, a fervent wish to understand and value what we have, even if sometimes it seems to act against us. The story itself is engaging – a page-turning mystery set in the isolation of the small fictitious island of Moondarrawah. The setting is ripe for intrigue – full of small-town gossip, relationships that flare and flounder, and plenty of local legends and loyalties. When Riley and his mother move to the island to recover from their grief and make a new start, they are viewed with suspicion and scorn. Local girl Ayla and her grandfather Grappa are nervous about sinister happenings in the small community and become worried when locals start looking for answers. Could it really be that Far Dorocha, the evil servant of the Faery Queen, has come into their midst? Or is that merely Grappa’s drunken imaginings? Why does Riley’s mother, Marlise, a renowned entomologist, seem to stir up trouble? And what is the dark family secret she is hiding? Who is protecting whom? Who is behind the series of deaths – both animal and people – on the island, or are they simply coincidental? The cast of characters is so well-drawn that one suspects D.M. Cameron has spent a fair amount of time people-watching in just such a small community. The friends and neighbours, workmates and family members are sketched with their foibles and flaws, their mistrust and prejudices, and their underlying and deeply united bonds. The characters are never black and white, but always shades of grey; never wholly good or totally bad. Under even the worst behaviour we can sense comprehensible motivations. In even the most appealing characters we catch glimpses of malice. There is addiction and alcoholism, violence and sexual manipulation, psychological exploitation and injustice and narrow-mindedness. The notion of shame, what it signifies and what it creates, is explored with sensitivity, as is the impression of outsiders versus insiders, with what people will do to fit in, and what will they might do when their attempts to fit in fail. The opening scene begins with Ayla setting free an injured pied cormorant, and this motif repeats throughout the story. The idea of themes and symbols, of the interpretation of signs and the hidden meaning of allegory, runs strongly through the story. Colour is used as metaphor, language as direction, the subtle hint of violence as a warning for the wary. The book is full of complicated relationships tangled and knotted by deceit, loyalty, familial bonds, expectation and promise. Some beautiful passages tie individuals and communities to country through past events – both atrocities and celebrations. The thrumming vibration of these ties are felt throughout the book. Stories are told and retold, as the author ponders who has the right to tell these stories; who has a right to claim them as their own. When Ayla says she feels she doesn’t belong, her mother reminds her that she is fifth generation Australian, and how far back does she have to go to belong? And yet, despite this, the author’s intention is clear: that the First People’s connection to country, historical and unbroken, remains foremost. The book explores the complex interactions between Indigenous and white people – not only how they are different, but all the many ways they might come together and create a common shared experience. At one point in the story, Riley ‘held his breath at the possibility of magic’ – and this is really the heart of this book: the possibility of magic, the wonder of ancestral stories, and the power of Mother Earth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carol - Reading Writing and Riesling

    My View: This is a unique read. An amazing debut that is sensitively written, evocative, and dreamy, at times with a childlike innocence that beguiles the reader. There is a wonderful mix of Indigenous and Irish traditional/folk stories that support a strong narrative that focusses on family, family ties and love. There is a sinister touch as historical and present day crimes intersect where blood has been shed and an evil miasma lurks. This is a powerful story unlike any other I have read. How d My View: This is a unique read. An amazing debut that is sensitively written, evocative, and dreamy, at times with a childlike innocence that beguiles the reader. There is a wonderful mix of Indigenous and Irish traditional/folk stories that support a strong narrative that focusses on family, family ties and love. There is a sinister touch as historical and present day crimes intersect where blood has been shed and an evil miasma lurks. This is a powerful story unlike any other I have read. How do you define this read, speculative fiction, love story, historical fiction, faery tale…so many styles create this engaging read. Maybe we shouldn’t try to define this, we should just read and enjoy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (JC-S)

    ‘You see better with your eyes shut.’ On Moondarrawah, a small island off the coast of Queensland, lives a small tight-knit community. Everyone knows everyone else’s business but, mostly, people respect each other’s boundaries. For Ayla, the island has always been home. She left for a while to study but soon returned. Her grandfather, known as Grappa (a name the community finds fitting) is filled with the Irish mythology shared with him by his grandmother. Grappa hears a flute being played, he’s ‘You see better with your eyes shut.’ On Moondarrawah, a small island off the coast of Queensland, lives a small tight-knit community. Everyone knows everyone else’s business but, mostly, people respect each other’s boundaries. For Ayla, the island has always been home. She left for a while to study but soon returned. Her grandfather, known as Grappa (a name the community finds fitting) is filled with the Irish mythology shared with him by his grandmother. Grappa hears a flute being played, he’s sure it’s the Far Dorocha, the dark servant of the faery queen returned to cause trouble. He hastens to the Nor Folk Tree to ask protection for Ayla. Two strangers have moved to the island. Riley and his mother Marlise have moved there following the death of Riley’s stepfather. Marlise is an entomologist, while Riley is the mysterious flute player. A series of strange deaths have the locals wondering: are they connected to the strangers? Part mystery and part love story, this novel also draws on Indigenous history and Irish mythology. Ms Cameron has written a novel in which these elements work together to demonstrate connections between people and place, between different perceptions of reality and ownership. Of the major characters, Marlise has secrets, Riley seeks answers, Ayla feels like she doesn’t belong. The island has history, as do the people who live there. The past is never far from the surface and the present is complicated. The environment is also important, and Ms Cameron describes the setting beautifully. The Mother Tree is central to the novel: important to both the Indigenous people and those of Irish heritage. There’s magic here, both in the story and in the telling of it. This is a novel to read and (in my case at least) to reread. This is Ms Cameron’s debut novel: I hope it is the first of many. Jennifer Cameron-Smith

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Walker

    This was a really original and enjoyable story. Set on an island in Moreton Bay, it weaves Irish and Aboriginal beliefs with a love story and some interesting entomology! I was gripped by the setting and the unique storyline.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jodi

    I did receive this book in return for an honest review. Beneath the Mother Tree was a surprising read. Novels with fantasy themes aren't my usual read, but the premise of the story was intriguing, and as it was woven into a contemporary story, I thought I'd give it a go - and I'm glad I did. It's hard to believe that DM Cameron is a debut novelist. The story and characters were beautifully and skillfully formed that of a much more experienced writer. And the setting was magical in itself, so imm I did receive this book in return for an honest review. Beneath the Mother Tree was a surprising read. Novels with fantasy themes aren't my usual read, but the premise of the story was intriguing, and as it was woven into a contemporary story, I thought I'd give it a go - and I'm glad I did. It's hard to believe that DM Cameron is a debut novelist. The story and characters were beautifully and skillfully formed that of a much more experienced writer. And the setting was magical in itself, so immersive you felt like you were there with the characters. It was evident that the author has done a lot of background research into the mythology and also the history of the local indigenous people of the southern Queensland islands/areas. She has included these aspects into the story in a sensitive and respectful way and I can say I am richer in knowledge after reading. As for the story itself, I found myself captivated from the very early pages and this was only heightened as the story progressed. It's definitely a page-turner and so beautifully written that you can't help but want to read on as the mystery unfolds. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would encourage others who wouldn't first choose this type of novel not to be perturbed by the fantasy element as you will be missing out on a stunning story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    4.5 ***** This story, filled with Irish folklore and indigenous beliefs and history somehow wove it's magic around me as I read it. It was a very interesting story, full of mystery as well as being a love story. Riley is a newcomer to the island, brought by his mother who has decided it is a good place to move. His mother is so controlling as well as being seemingly quite mad, I wanted to throttle her. Riley is a simple person, I felt like he was half man, half boy. He has been completely shelte 4.5 ***** This story, filled with Irish folklore and indigenous beliefs and history somehow wove it's magic around me as I read it. It was a very interesting story, full of mystery as well as being a love story. Riley is a newcomer to the island, brought by his mother who has decided it is a good place to move. His mother is so controlling as well as being seemingly quite mad, I wanted to throttle her. Riley is a simple person, I felt like he was half man, half boy. He has been completely sheltered and controlled by his mother and in moving to the island things are about to change all this. I loved the character Grappa who provided me with plenty of entertainment. Ayla was just the right person to meet Riley and I loved how the two of them interacted, both coming from such different places. The descriptions of events and of the island were wonderfully realised and I was completely transported there in my mind. The arrival of Riley and his mother set off a chain of events that cause plenty of trouble as well as bring with them plenty of mystery, I really enjoyed this book and the unfolding of events as we get answers as well as more questions. I loved the weaving of folklore into it and how at times it was hard to decide what was real and what was not. I also loved how the power of imagination was woven into the story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kylie Purdie

    So in the interests of full disclosure - I know the author of this book and I live on one the islands she draws inspiration from. Having said that, in some ways it makes it trickier. What if you read it and hate it? What if you struggle to get past the first page let alone the first chapter? What if... Quite quickly I realised I had absolutely nothing to worry about. Within pages I was fully immersed it the world Cameron had created. While I caught glimpses of places and people I know, the world So in the interests of full disclosure - I know the author of this book and I live on one the islands she draws inspiration from. Having said that, in some ways it makes it trickier. What if you read it and hate it? What if you struggle to get past the first page let alone the first chapter? What if... Quite quickly I realised I had absolutely nothing to worry about. Within pages I was fully immersed it the world Cameron had created. While I caught glimpses of places and people I know, the world was also new and fresh. Cameron has beautifully captured the rhythms and uniqueness of small island living - your life being directed by tides and ferries. The idosincracies of locals and locations. I found Ayla and Riley completely engaging. I believed their life stories, could see how their experiences until now had shaped them and the how and where they had been raised influenced their world view and decisions. Grappa was equal parts lovable and annoying. Most of all I loved The Mother Tree and the mythology surrounding it. The idea of such a beautiful essential part of nature standing guard over an island community is perfect. I imagined the roots of the Mother Tree spreading out below the ground and literally holding the island together. This debut novel is a fantastic read. The story original, the characters believable and the setting magical. Definitely a read I will be recommending to others.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Koletti

    Just finished an early release copy of the novel. A great love story intertwined with murder and fantasy. A great read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    Longer review to come on blog.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    This was more than I was expecting, it was pretty great. It had juicy drama, slight creepy-ness, lyrical writing, sweetness, engaging atmosphere, mythical magic, little bit of mystery. Nice mixed bag. I will be looking out for the next from D.M. Cameron.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julia Tulloh Harper

    This was a really cool and wonderfully strange book. Set on an island off the Aussie coast, it follows several characters - Ayla and her grandfather (who is an alcoholic) and Riley and his mum (who is a sociopath). It's essentially about their relationships - negotiating friendships, family relationships, romance, small-town life... and integrated into everything is Irish folklore (the stories told by Ayla's grandpa - the faery there are known as the Nor Folk, who dwell primarily in the Norfolk This was a really cool and wonderfully strange book. Set on an island off the Aussie coast, it follows several characters - Ayla and her grandfather (who is an alcoholic) and Riley and his mum (who is a sociopath). It's essentially about their relationships - negotiating friendships, family relationships, romance, small-town life... and integrated into everything is Irish folklore (the stories told by Ayla's grandpa - the faery there are known as the Nor Folk, who dwell primarily in the Norfolk Pine) and Aboriginal lore. DM Cameron incorporated Aboriginal characters and stories in consultation with local elders, whom she knows well it seems, which is awesome. It all makes for an eerie and dream-like narrative where you often don't know what's real or not: what is clear, though, at all times, is the deep respect for the land and its history that emanates from this story. Some moments of incredible writing. I really loved this one and totally didn't expect it to go where it did. Thanks to Donna Cameron for the ARC (that said, I also went and bought my own hard copy!)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sally Piper

    This is a strong debut that cleverly interweaves magic realism with reality. It is a story of love, faith and loyalty set in a small island community that carries a terrible, mostly forgotten Indigenous history, which, along with Irish mythology, is brought to life through the actions of a compelling cast of characters.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Surprising blend of mythology, psychopaths and substance abuse. Who would have thought that would work?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Wood

    The skill of great writing is the way it draws you into a story so wholly that you can feel the character's hot breath and their heartbeat as though they were your own. In D.M. Cameron's Beneath The Mother Tree, it is the claustrophobic closeness of the locals and their way of life that is upset by the arrival of two strangers on the island, all set against the stench of mangrove mud, a flute's melody, and the incessant buzz of mosquitoes, so beautifully told that you become a part of the story. B The skill of great writing is the way it draws you into a story so wholly that you can feel the character's hot breath and their heartbeat as though they were your own. In D.M. Cameron's Beneath The Mother Tree, it is the claustrophobic closeness of the locals and their way of life that is upset by the arrival of two strangers on the island, all set against the stench of mangrove mud, a flute's melody, and the incessant buzz of mosquitoes, so beautifully told that you become a part of the story. Bad things are happening on the island and only Grappa knows why. But will anybody heed his warnings before it is too late? A superb debut novel.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Walshe

    I was lucky enough to win a copy of this book in a pre-release giveaway. It is beautifully written, so original and very engrossing. It is wonderful to read a book that captures the extraordinary beauty of parts of coastal Australia and includes some quintessentially Australian characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bec Begg

    Well written with a very unexpected twist. I inhaled the last half of this in a single sitting. I enjoyed the themes it brought up and the references to indigenous matters. Very well done!

  23. 5 out of 5

    El

    I loved reading this book. I decided to finish reading it this morning and stayed in bed reading it determined to finish it. Well I just did and I was not disappointed. It is a great story, one that drew me in and kept me turning the pages. I loved the stories within the story. The folk lore, the love and human pain. Really really hope you keep writing more books DM Cameron. I will definitely recommend it to everyone to read. As it’s a very very good read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Renee Judd

    Just loved this book and was mesmerised throughout. Beautifully written, fascinating characters, history, fantasy and mystery - this book has everything! So beautifully crafted, you felt like you were part of the story. Can't wait for the next release from D.M. Cameron!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A well-written and engaging read which deftly uses Irish/Celtic mythology and its connection with nature as a counterpoint to traditional Indigenous connection with land. I loved the mystery aspect, the nagging sense of unease, of something or someone slowly unraveling and was pleased that the love story did not overwhelm this.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dani Ringrose

    Got a little tingle of satisfaction when I realized that the fictional mosquito-infested island sounded a lot like coochiemudlo off the coast of Brisbane. Turns out, inspired by those islands. Evocative weaving of irish folktales and tales of indigenous heartbreak. Wonderful sense of space.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Bowyer

    A fascinating concept, linking folk lore from Ireland with Indigenous spirituality together on a small island in northern Australia.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leah Stansfield

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rosalie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.